Thursday, August 9, 2007

New panties.

The Tuesday after her husband left
Amanda Anderson stood frowning
in front of the panty bin--
at a loss
as she realized that she could not
remember her size.

But she knew the
one thing that could bring her down
lower than
wearing raggedy, worn-out panties
after her husband left her for a
twenty-three-year old, would be
new panties
that were too tight and left her spilling
out and crowded in.

Pragmatist that she
was, Amanda bought all the
largest size
they had in stock--in lace, silk, cotton,
and mesh--twenty-seven pair in all.

Throughout that February
she wept in
front of strangers, friends and family
while the cold winter wind blew up the
gigantic legholes of her new panties.

She felt as
frigid and undesirable as
she must surely have been to lose her
husband in such a tired and
clich├ęd way.

2 comments:

Anonymous said...

When I read this entry it simply afirmed what I was thinking after reading the soapbox entry yesterday, particularly the comments. Why is it we still depend on men to define us as significant and important before we feel we are? And I see the same thing in the young girls of today.
Another female reader

Anonymous said...

Dear dear women, by the very nature of genetics there are more women in the world than men. Women control over 80% of the money in the U.S. If we are discriminated against, which we most certainly are, then it's because we CHOOSE to fund the discrimination. If there were any solidarity at all among women we would vote for (and fund) only those individuals that champion our cause. Through our consolidated voting we could literally change the face of government. We would spend our monies at companies that provide and prove to be equal for women. They are our dollars and our votes; we need only use both in a manner that helps us instead of continuing to augment the entities that continue to oppress us.